Monday, July 14, 2008

Operation's Fish!? What the Fish!?- WW

I was at the newly refurbished wet market in Chinatown and saw this :


It's the Common Snakehead. haha..... We Chinese valued it for its medicinal value when eaten. It is highly recommended for post-operation patients because it is good for healing wounds.

If you're feeling tired and stressed, you might want to have a double-boiled snakehead fish soup with American ginseng to help boost your energy. Some traditional Chinese recipes using the snakehead are popular with mothers as they are believed to help nursing mothers improve their milk flow as well as volume.

Don't ask me if men would have milk flowing out after they drink too much. I haven't tried that on my guys. hehe.......

The man in the picture bought 5 Operation's Fish.

3rd generation stall-owner, Mrs Evon Wong is more than happy to share recipes with her customers. I was very impressed when I overheard her telling a male customer how to boil soup for his wife who was hospitalised for a surgery. She even gave her handphone number for him to call should he encounter problems. How sweet of her!

For health-conscious wives, you may want to check this stall out for some good advice on nutritious soups for your family. Mrs Wong has some great recipes.

ugly bullfrogs, yummy delicacy

cleaned and gutted, ready to cook

She sells live fish and frogs. After the customer has selected them, she would clean and gut them. She sells fresh crocodile meat (good for asthmatic patients) too. All these are wonderful ingredients in traditional Chinese recipes for nutritious or healing dishes.

Block 335 B1-61/62 Smith Street, Chinatown Complex, Singapore 050335.

Champion - Chicken Rice Eating Contest 2008




71 comments:

  1. There's so much to see at Chinatown Complex. Interesting how the common snakehead is being described as operation's fish.

    I wonder if the stall owner cooks snakehead for people...

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  2. interesting! i have eaten frogs legs at a restaurant before .. it was ok. :)

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  3. Hola ECL! Aiyo... I think no matter how yummy, I can never take the bullfrog! ;)

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  4. oceanskies,
    Quite funny to use that name for the fish. But it's good publicity. It attracted my attention. :)

    The stall-owner doesn't have the time to cook for her customers but she can recommend the food stalls that can do so.

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  5. mharia,
    The ugly creatures are so yummy! ... if they are cooked well. :P

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  6. mariuca,
    aiyoh... you haven't tried bullfrog? Come, come, to Singapore.... I bring you to try yummy frog dishes. :P

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  7. My rainbow fish,
    Yah...
    you also chi keik me... I type rainbow fish wor!!
    Not gonna change. hehe....

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  8. the snake head is deliciuos rite.. how they cook in hong kong? here in malaysia they cook steam it with ginger.. very nice..

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  9. dookie,
    Hong Kong? I'm in Singapore. :)

    Besides steaming, it can be stir-fry, deep-fry, cooking it in soups, braised....

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  10. this reminds me of the seafood restaurant at Guangzhou when they had a myraid of seafood - the usual and the bizarre on display outside. And I've also tasted like around 15 diferent shellfish dishes in E Malaysia. Awesome!

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  11. sho,
    When I was in Hong Kong and major coastal cities in China, the variety of seafood blew me away!

    You dare to eat so much shellfish? Hepatitis A & B wor. o.O

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  12. Who knows, eastcoast! Anything could heal wounds including these fish and American? ginseng. Don't you have ginseng over there? Ha!

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  13. the teach,
    Nope, we don't have Singaporean ginseng... there are Chinese ginseng and Korean ginseng. :)

    Not every thing can heal wounds, Mary! Liver and certain seafood can aggravate wounds. Don't play play.

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  14. I emailed you leh. Haven't check email yet?

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  15. Select a live frog????? I couldn't do that!!!!

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  16. ECL, even though you're all the way in Singapore, I love your blog and I'm always thankful when you make the time to come visit my own blog, so what the heck, I'd love to send you some of the Livestrong items as well! Just email me your mailing address (bonggamom@Yahoo.com) within the next 5 days and I'll get the stuff sent out to you.

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  17. interesting one!!! Great shots.... I've tried to vote you but need I/C No... dunno about it--- maybe this only for Singaporean??? My WW entry is up , hope you can drop by.

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  18. Thanks for info, it's make me know much about Chinatown complex

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  19. I remember following my old ma-jie to that Chinatown market and getting "shang-yu" whenever someone is sick.
    "Operational" fish.... hahahahha!! The boss of that fish stall "beary clever"!!

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  20. Recipes! I must go visit Mrs Wong one of these days to get recipes from her. Have not been to Chinatown market for a long time.

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  21. Capt Picard,
    The stall-owner can select for you.
    But would you cook it? hmmm...

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  22. Oh bonggamom,
    Thank you so much!! I appreciate that. Whoopeee!

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  23. prettylifeonline,
    Awwww.... thanks so much for wanting to vote for me.

    The I/C number is your identification or passport number for verification when collecting prizes.

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  24. imcw,
    There's still lots of info to be posted. I need time which is limited these days! Help!

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  25. napaboaniya,
    Wah! You got ma-jie!

    Chinatown wet market is popular for its live seafood and the unusual stuff... I couldn't locate the stall that sells turtles.

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  26. lzmommy,
    Go visit her stall and get her nutritious recipes. Her stuff is very fresh.

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  27. chinese have a lot of recuperative food. it's amazing actually.
    handphone hubby's ah? wah piang.

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  28. misti,
    hehehe... he almost had a heart attack. wahahahahaha.... rofl

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  29. tigerfish,
    Yah... I forgot about you, another fish. hehe

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  30. Uh. ECL. This is Wordless Wednesday....laughing. *lovies* The first foto, btw, makes me sad 'cause the U.S. hasn't figured out how to be healthy yet. I, however ,know what we're doing wrong. I just don't talk about it. I like hearing about it though - nice work.

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  31. Frogs & crocodiles? Are these even legal? OMG...

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  32. I have eaten crocodile but I think I'll pass on the bull frogs.

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  33. wow! frogs!!! i don't eat that. you eat frogs?

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  34. Very informative post!

    Thanks for your comments at my 'i Share'. Happy WW!

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  35. Hello dear ECL, I've something for you at my place, come get it! Thanks!

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  36. Probably we eat in our western world things that Chinese people would find disgusting, so ....
    I watched a documentary yesterday about China (we learn a lot for the moment because of the Olympics) It was about the first emperior Chin until the last who had to leave. Very interesting ! Most of the story I knew of course.

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  37. I heard of this kind of fish but never seen it before. So this is how they look like.

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  38. I don't know about "operation's fish" but at my local fish market we have someone who sounds a lot like your Mrs. Wong. She knows everything about every kind of fish -- what it's good for, how to cook it -- everything. I feel sorry for people who live places where they cannot get fresh fish.

    Bobbie

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  39. He he he, nevermind la, froggy not my taste mah he he! Anyway, I am here to give u and Jaymes my vote, when is the contest gonna end btw? :)

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  40. Wah, Jaymes still holding on to his number 1 spot, now must get his mommy to number 1 too LOL! ;)

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  41. WOAH!!! Didn't know that. You take care of so many elderly. No wonder you know al these. In future I have to consult u liao.. Take care of ailing bf.. =p

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  42. chuck,
    Aren't you Wordless? :P

    We Chinese have lots of traditional cures and treatments. In the past, each family has its own remedies for certain ailments.

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  43. horsoon,
    Crocodile and frog meat is commonly sold and consumed. Wild boar meat is banned here.

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  44. sailor,
    Come to Singapore, after you have tried the bullfrog dishes, you would have a different opinion. It tastes like chicken.

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  45. the dong,
    Yes, I eat frogs. :)

    I'll write a post on that. :)

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  46. gattina,
    Yes, we do have very different eating habits.

    ahhhh... western countries are learning more about the Chinese due to the coming Olympics. That's good.

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  47. Doreen,
    Yes, not very handsome but tastes good. hehe....

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  48. Bobbie,
    Most of the fish we bought at the wet market is already dead. Live fish cost more and need more space to display.

    I usually have to go to one particular fishmonger to get fresh fish.

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  49. mariuca,
    Thanks for your votes.

    Jaymes isn't in Number 1 spot. OMG! You vote for the wrong person!

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  50. thb,
    Pathetic plight of the future generations. One taking care of 4 elderly.

    Sure, you can ask me anything and I'll share with you if I know. :)

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  51. ECL!!! Don't panic he he... I've been voting for the right Jaymes, in red right? Just that his pic is the first one, so I thought he's number one he he, all's not lost yet, the votes still went to him! :):):)

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  52. Mariuca,
    hehe.... I thought you voted for the wrong Jaymes!

    Thanks. *hugs*

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  53. Oh my golly! I'd eat veggies all my life but not those..lol Interesting!

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  54. Wow, such a clean and organised wet market! I'm impressed!

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  55. Fascinating market! I always found Chinese medicine so interesting. I don't know if I believe in all of it, but it is a lot older then Western medicine and I think there is a lot to be said for it.

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  56. After seeing all the fishes gutted and displayed in the picture I don't feel like having fish anymore.

    Hmm... don't they put it behind a transparent freezer?

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  57. Nice one, perfect catch for WW! Mine's up too hope you can drop by. Happy wordless wednesday!

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  58. yen,
    It's not so bad. There was no nauseating smell.

    After they are cooked, the soups are so sweet and nutritious. :P

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  59. dianeca,
    Chinese medicine and traditional treatments have been around for thousands of years and the West is studying it now and are also using it in certain medical practices.

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  60. ck,
    I didn't show the gruesome gutting wor! o.O

    You will love the soups and dishes after I have cooked them.

    They are freshly cut and usually sold out by 2pm. If they are put in a freezer, the customers would think the meats were frozen and has been thawed.

    Not easy to please customers these days. tsk tsk tsk....

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  61. OMG! I was in Singapore in april and saw things like this in Chinatown. Sooo cool.

    Off to check out more of your blog. Happy ww!

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