Friday, September 16, 2011

Wooden Houses in Kampong Buangkok - PH

PhotoHunt theme : Wooden


Wooden houses have become a rare sight in land-scarce Singapore. Singapore’s last remaining residential village on its mainland, Kampong Buangkok, is rich in heritage and history.

This kampong evoke the nostalgia and fond memories of yours truly who have long left to move into the comfort and convenience of modern housing.

I grew up in a kampong and had the best years of my life there.


Kitchen and outdoor dining area :)

There were wide, open spaces for the children to run around. We went fishing in the drains and combed the bushes for spiders. We climbed trees to pick edible fruits. We had lots of fun as kids in the village, it was a simple and carefree lifestyle.

The adults could plant anything, anywhere and keep any kind of pets they wanted because neighbours did not mind.

dirt road leading to the village

Everybody knew everybody in the village. Our doors were always left open. We only latched them at night.

We watched out for one another. Whether there was a celebration or a death, the whole village would be there to lend a helping hand.

we used water from a well

We had taps in our house but my mother and grandmother would still draw water from a well to wash clothes and water the vegetables they grow. Every now and then, the kids would bathe using the well water because it was colder. :P 

Some outsiders feel that kampongs are backward and unhygienic and only the lowly-educated population live in one. I feel that people who live in a kampong are a happy and contented lot.


nicely done up wooden houses

Kampong Buangkok would be demolished one day. I can't even show anything resembling it to my grandchildren because everything would be gone!

Better go to the kampong soon before they tear it down!


28 comments:

  1. This is so nostalgic, ECL!

    It's a pity quaint villages like this won't be around for long. But that's the price of development, I guess.

    I miss Kampong life since I am always a Kampong gal. ^^

    ReplyDelete
  2. I wonder how long more will they be around...

    ReplyDelete
  3. You so need to go and visit and take pictures. It sounds like it was such a beautiful time in your life. As progress goes on all the good simple things in life vanish.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Ouch..why would they want to demolish the kampung? >.< Very sayang lah..Back at my kampung in Sabah, they are still lots of people staying in wooden houses and kampungs :) So much fun when there are gathering/parties :)

    ReplyDelete
  5. Lina,
    I like the simple kampong life but dislike the mosquitoes. :D

    You can still visit a kampong in Malaysia, here in Singapore, it will completely vanish.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Jama,
    Even the owner doesn't know. But just go visit before they tear it down.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Russ,
    Yes, I have visited it several times, sometimes bringing friends and their kids there to see it.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Kenny,
    Singapore is just a small island, land is scarce. In order to house the 'increasing' population, they will demolish this kampong to make way for more apartments.

    I enjoyed the get-together and festive celebrations in my kampong.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Your best years sound just like my best years.. We probably lived in the oldest home on our road.. My great-grandfather's old home.. this post brings back memories..
    Loved your photos of the wooden houses.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Love your childhood memories and the place! Nice wooden houses!

    wooden

    ReplyDelete
  11. kampung life is the most carefree - without the stress and harsh reality of the urban life.

    too bad they're gonna tear it down like u say... why isn't there a petition by singaporeans to stop it from the encroaching development? it's the last piece of authentic kampung in singapore after all!

    ReplyDelete
  12. I missed my kampung life in Penang. i was raised in a kampung but sadly now my kampung is no longer a kampung. it's full of concrete jungle. :(

    ReplyDelete
  13. When I saw your first picture I thought it only would need a little refurbishment and painting and it would look good. And indeed you showed it at the end. I also had the chance to spend my early childhood with my grandparents on the countryside where life was fun (at least for us kids) !

    ReplyDelete
  14. I didn't realise that there were still single storey structures left in Singapore! :O

    ReplyDelete
  15. Yes, I would encourage parents to bring their children there before it is gone forever.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I like the community spirit you describe in these kampongs. You never get that in an apartment building. Even if all the same people lived there, it would not be as open.

    ReplyDelete
  17. It would be great if these could be preserved as a heritage site so future generations could know what life was like living in a a village. Happy weekend ECL!

    ReplyDelete
  18. I always learn so much about your country thru your eyes - i can understand the warmth these homes have

    ReplyDelete
  19. They are becoming a rare site here as well and that makes me sad. I love wooden houses.

    My entries for Wooden are here and here.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Hey Ecl, you visited Kampung Buangkok recently? I suppose that it is the sense of connected-ness and community that me and peers could have missed. My grandmother at times tell me how much she misses the kampung days. Thanks for sharing and bringing me there two years ago.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Great memories and look around there. It's too bad they are all being demolished.

    ReplyDelete
  22. It would be a shame to tear buildings like that down! They have such character!
    Here's My Photo

    ReplyDelete
  23. The fifth picture reminds me of where I'm from, Puerto Rico. There are area that the houses look just like that. Thanks for sharing.

    http://isolated-existence.blogspot.com/2011/09/belated-photohunt-wooden.html

    ReplyDelete
  24. Yeah its so carefree..during those days. We never have to carry any house keys as the main doors are all traditional China style, a piece of wood sliding across two doors from the inside, practically they are not locked 7/24.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Another painful tale of intimate & community living becoming extinct due to the craze for urbanization. Those are wonderful pictures of pure nature, neighborhood, big lung space. It must be truly a cherished place in land scarce country and a rarity. No wonder you would want to go back!

    Enjoyed reading.

    ReplyDelete
  26. wooden houses are part of every culture but I honestly prefer to live in a concrete one =P

    ReplyDelete
  27. I am actually one of those 67% who still pays for rent but I am saving up to have a home of my own soon too. I definitely would agree that it would be one of the best long term investments out there. Although cars are more fun, I'd still like to have a house of my own first. I used to see this kind of houses before.

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

LinkWithin

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...