Friday, June 12, 2009

No Locks - PH

old village huts on Jeju island

On a trip to Jeju Island (South Korea), I learnt that villagers in the old days did not have to lock their doors. If they were going out, they just put a wooden post across the entrance to keep animals from entering their houses.

I lived in a village when I was a kid. It wasn't necessary to lock our doors too. We were poor and there was nothing worth stealing. :)


The door wasn't locked! We just walked in!

In Daegu city (3rd largest city in Korea), while enjoying a stroll and admiring the beautiful, traditional Korean houses, we noticed we could just push open any door. They were not locked!

In a Korean traditional medicine shop

It was freezing cold that night. Although it was way past opening hours, this young apprentice didn't lock us out in the cold when we came knocking on its door to buy some medicine for a sick member.









First Commenter - Sgshortstories

99 comments:

  1. Imagine not locking our homes when we're away these days...no way Jose. Too risky.

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  2. I guess they don't have thieves and robbers like us here. Here in KL, Malaysia, robbery and crime is so rampant you have to have double locks for your doors!

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  3. Sometimes the criminals are so daring, they even jump into your house compound in broad daylight and rob you! It's scary!

    If only we are like this place in Jeju Island!

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  4. sg short stories,
    Yeah! Kampong spirit!

    Congrats for being the FC of this post.

    Long time no see wor.

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  5. Mei Teng,
    If I don't lock my doors and even the windows, I'll probably return to an empty house. :)

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  6. foongpc,
    Not many thieves and robbers in the small villages but I'm surprised in a big city like Daegu, the traditional houses are not locked.

    Probably the Korean owners are proud to show off their heritage because when they see us, they welcomed us warmly to explore their houses.

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  7. I would love to visit Jeju someday. :) So nice to be able to live in a village where you can trust everyone.

    If I not only lock my windows and doors, and put grilles around them too, I'd be coming back to an empty home too. @_@

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  8. foongpc,
    Robbery in broad daylight is too bold! I'm relieved it doesn't happen often in Singapore.

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  9. Yes, probably it's their culture. I wonder if they have robberies there!

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  10. Eh, I didn't know Jack Neo and Mark Lee owns the Old Town White Coffee chain in Singapore! You mean they are the franchise holder? Wow! So rich, making movies not enough? : )

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  11. Lina,
    Jeju is a very picturesque and lovely island with residents who warmly welcome visitors.

    Visit the Teddy Bear Museum!

    Oh yah, we need grilles for our windows too. :)

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  12. foongpc,
    I'm not sure if there are robberies in Jeju Island. Might have a few robberies due to the large influx of tourists.

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  13. foongpc,
    Both hold the franchise. The chain is profitable with many people dining at the outlets. I'm one of their loyal customers. :)

    They will always be 'Money No Enough' lah. Maybe another movie coming. hehe.....

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  14. it is pretty cool not having to worry about locking the door before heading out. i never had the chance to experience that. :)

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  15. The 2nd pic will be perfect if you were wearing Korean traditional dress. Hehehehe

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  16. The spirit of the good old days.Like my Katong SIGH!
    I hope Jeju stays that way and doesn't get caught up in the materialistic rat race.The youth there might get enticed into our modern day cultural nonsense that the tourists impose.

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  17. korea! i was there in 2003.. haha..
    jeju island is pretty familiar.. cant recall much.. =)

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  18. Even walking on the streets these days have the risk of being robbed. So with the door unlock we are asking for trouble here. Honesty must be their best policy in Korea..ha.ha

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  19. levian,
    Seems like these days it's not safe to leave our doors open. Even when doors are locked, we can have burglary or theft.

    Don't try it by going out with your door left open! :)

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  20. Doreen,
    I should have bought the Korean traditional dress! :P

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  21. jean,
    To the good old days!!

    On Jeju Island, most of its young people have gone to work in the larger cities. You see more of the older folks.

    It's a beautiful island, lots of young couples go there for honeymoon.

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  22. kenwooi,
    You must be quite young in year 2003. :P

    It's a fascinating place to visit. I want to go back again.

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  23. sweet jasmine,
    I heard it is unsafe to walk on the streets in some countries. I have no problem walking home at night in Singapore. It's quite safe here.

    The people on Jeju Island seems to know one another, so it's unlikely they would rob their own people. :)

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  24. Not locking the houses here in the Philippines is simply inviting thieves. LOL!

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  25. Ruz,
    I have a Filipino friend who lives in Manila, had a house break-in several years ago and the burglars carry revolvers!

    Their gates and doors were locked and yet the burglars could enter. Scary!

    Luckily they were not harmed.

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  26. Great post for this week! I lived in a country town when I was a teenager and we didn't lock the doors then either. :)

    http://lesliesmyers.blogspot.com/2009/06/photohunt-lock-up-cat-food.html

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  27. Kampong spirit is barely found in SG right now even though we're considered living in a safe country.

    People locking up baby prams now days *sweat.drops*

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  28. You did well on the theme. Nowadays, we cant leave our house unlocked. You are right, by the time we come home, our place would be empty!

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  29. Oh wow, Korean -especially Jeju is one place I really want to visit -especially after having seen those Korean dramas! You're lucky, you got to visit Korea! :)

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  30. Last time neighbour hood had the strong trust between them. But not for now. In KL, must lock the door.

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  31. I wish I lived in a place and time where locks were not needed.

    Sigh....

    Happy photo hunting. I played too :)

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  32. These old village huts remind me of the trip to North Korea some years back. As one travels from Pyongyang to the outlying areas,one could see hundreds of such village huts. It is believed and confirmed by the tour guide that the mother of Kim Jong Ill was born in one of these huts.

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  33. wow, jeju island! It's in my travel list too. During old times they don't even have doors in the tribal villages in the Phil. =)

    a pleasant weekend to you ECL!

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  34. I think many years ago, people did not bother. A sign of the times.

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  35. I'd love to live in a world without locked doors!! it would mean I am in paradise :)
    Happy PH and happy hunting!
    My PH

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  36. Sadly leaving the door unlocked is not something we cannot afford to do. A shame but I would rather a lock than my stuff stolen! Happy weekend

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  37. it's also known as the "Honeymoon Island"! ;-)

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  38. My grandparents were farmers, and they never locked their doors. Ever. Have a good weekend, ECL.

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  39. Hey ECL long time since i have been here. How have you been. I like Monicas version honey moon wooo hooo.

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  40. Nice creative take on the theme. I cannot imagine not locking our doors nowadays.

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  41. Ooo, not Singapore in focus but Korea this week! Makes for quite a change -- and have to say I really like this entry. Nice one, eastcoastlife! :)

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  42. Nice move converting the theme to no lock. I can't imagine not having to lock the doors, must have been nice!

    Happy weekend

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  43. Here in US all houses are lock even day or night. In the Philippines its true the danger is always there. But what I like is in day time because you can open your door no one will enter...

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  44. Long ago in my childhood, we didn't lock the doors.. we were poor so maybe that's why .... today even poor people need to lock up everything... I really, really enjoyed your post. Korea is interesting...perfect for the theme!

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  45. Leslie,
    Isn't it wonderful that people observe an honour system and not take advantage of one another? It's a scary world these days.

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  46. napaboaniya,
    There is still a bit of kampong spirit in some parts of Singapore.

    They should have kept their prams at home, then no need to lock. :D

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  47. Tes,
    You should try to visit Korea once and Jeju Island is really beautiful! You need to go with your hubby. :)

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  48. Ebie,
    The more things we possessed, the more insecure we are. :P

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  49. keeyit,
    Living in a city with all sorts of people from all over the country and world, it's hard to leave doors unlocked. :)

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  50. Sue,
    Yeah, I want to live in a place that no locks is required on doors, people know one another and there is an honour system.

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  51. stanley,
    You went to North Korea!? Wow. What a precious trip! I would love to visit it one day.

    It's only the elderly who would live in these huts in some rural parts of Korea. It's a tough but simple life with no electricity and tap water.

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  52. I suppose when there is high degree of trust in a neighbourhood, locks are no longer necessary.

    It is just like our hearts. When people trust, and deserves to be trusted, it is so much easier to allow our hearts to be opened, without too much guardedness.

    Have a good weekend.

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  53. Ayie,
    I'm amazed to see that there are many countries which have this no locking of doors in the old days.

    People have changed over the years... probably with the numerous material things in this world, the temptations to own them is too much to suppress.:)

    Go to Jeju Island with hubby for another honeymoon. You would love it.

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  54. Capt Picard,
    It wasn't necessary to have locks in the old days. Truly, people have changed.

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  55. Mar,
    Yes! I want to live in such a paradise too.... if there is one.

    Can anyone point me to one? :D

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  56. jams,
    I too feel sad that trust and honour is not commonly found in people these days. I better keep my doors locked. :)

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  57. I love "NO LOCKS"...wouldn't that life be wonderful!

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  58. I wonder if we living in our "locked" world could adjust to that life and not worry the whole time?

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  59. Great post and photos as usual ECL. I don't know which one I like best, maybe the gate. Happy weekend to you.

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  60. Monica,
    Jeju Island is indeed a romantic place for couples. Have your honeymoon there!
    Happy weekend!

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  61. Gran,
    Your grandparents lived in a precious time that doesn't exist anymore in the present society. It was a time where people have a closely-knit family and trusted friends. :)

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  62. Bill,
    Long time no see!
    You should bring your wife for a honeymoon in Jeju! :)

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  63. Sassy Mom,
    I'm scared to leave my doors open or unlocked. No way in this city, even though it's considered safe. :D

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  64. YSTL,
    Thank you. :D
    I visited a prison once and I don't like the idea of being locked up and not having access to the internet. :D

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  65. candi,
    I was staying in a small village once and the houses have no locks. They are poor farmers.

    Can you imagine they don't have much food on their tables too? Every harvest they have is sold to keep them until the next harvest. When they have drought or flood, they go hungry for days, months...

    This is not the type of no locks that I want. :)

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  66. gengen,
    In Singapore too, most people keep their doors locked. We even added grille gates and windows. Double protection. :)

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  67. ancient one,
    You lived in a great time.

    I'm sad that the poor or elderly these days do get their stuff stolen or they would get cheated.

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  68. oceanskies,
    It's true that where there is a high degree of trust, people will tend to leave doors open.

    I'm glad to have you as a trustworthy friend. I have no problems telling you things about myself or my family. I value your friendship and will not lock my heart from you. :)

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  69. Claudia,
    Life with 'No locks' will be wonderful when the people we are with are as trustworthy and honorable. :)

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  70. marcia,
    That's a good question!

    It would probably take me some time to leave that guardedness behind and to trust the people around me. :P

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  71. A really nice and creative take on this week’s theme.
    I love your photos.
    Happy weekend to you.

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  72. with the high crime index rate, it's unsafe to leave our doors unlocked these days.

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  73. Aloha from Maui!

    Very interesting & understandable. Great take:)

    Happy PH,
    Cindy O
    http://upcountrysmiles.com

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  74. Just like Canada eh? It's a good concept and I don't think it has much to do with whether or not there are things to steal ...

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  75. Life Ramblings,
    Right, don't take the risk. :D

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  76. Upcountrysmiles,
    ni hao!
    Thanks and have a lovely weekend!

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  77. Wilfrid,
    People still leave their doors open in Canada?

    Burglars or robbers these days don't just steal, they kill too. Scary.

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  78. Very thoughtful and in sharp contrast to what we see in the socalled "Modern" world.

    btw. It's nice to be back on PH

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  79. It's nice that there are still places where you don't need to lock your doors. I enjoyed this post and photographs.

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  80. I really enjoyed this post. I love learning about other parts of the world via PhotoHunt. I too grew up in a small town where no one locked their doors!

    Thanks for visiting mine and have a great weekend.

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  81. I'll take note of that ECL! Hubs will definitely love that idea! haha!

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  82. An interesting post again ECL, with great pictures. I could wish people had different reasons for not locking their doors.

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  83. I loved my trips to Korea. Hangovers not so good.

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  84. Like what u said, no use to lock our doors since there's nothing much to steal. However, many like to steal our durians.

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  85. Great architecture and interior. I'm always curious about all things Korean, lock or no lock. Thanks so much :D

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  86. hi, ECL. I've got an award for you for being my top 10 commenters : )

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  87. Ahhhh, the reverse effect,...lol. Great idea. I posted late if you want to stop by. I took a different take on the theme this week.

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  88. As usual you get visit cool places whilst I'm stuck at home lol XD

    Think I'm going to take the MSAT in August :)

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  89. When I was young, we did not lock our house - but that was long time ago when there was no stealing.

    Btw: Sorry I haven't been around that much lately. Have been travelling and my first post from Budapest is up.

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  90. yea, I remembered those days ... now, even with multiple locks, break-ins are still happening and rampant. :(

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  91. Gosh, I wish we live in those days when lock was not needed...



    My entries are posted here and here.

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  92. Great entry. It somehow reflects how people used to have complete trust on others. Sadly, in this modern time, it is best to secure one's home to avoid untoward incidents.

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