Friday, June 28, 2013

Peranakan Wedding Gift Exchange Ceremony - PhotoHunt

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Oranges, brandy, dragon and phoenix candles 

PhotoHunt theme : With what do you like to travel/Citrus

Listening to the museum guide explaining some of the cultures and rituals (although many are no longer in practice today) of Peranakans, it was fascinating. The Lap Chai Ceremony (Wedding Gift Exchange Ceremony) between the families of the bride and groom before the wedding is especially interesting.

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raw pork trotter

"The exchange of a raw pork trotter serves as an acknowledgement by the bridegroom’s family that they were receiving a virginal bride." (These days it is hard to find a virgin bride.)

Citrus fruits such as oranges are given by the bridegroom as they are auspicious fruits. The round shape symbolises good wishes for a ‘full’ and long life. A pair of red candles and two bottles of brandy are included.

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jewellery and a red packet

This is interesting, the bridegroom thanking the bride's parents for bringing her up. Besides a set of clothing and a tray of jewellery, a red packet containing the ‘wang tetek’ (breast money – money remitted to the bride’s mother for her breast-fed milk) is delivered to the bride.

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Peranakan Bridal Chamber

These rituals are similar to what I had to go through during my Chinese wedding. My parents returned most of what were given and replaced with other similar produce. A dowry is usually returned as accepting dowry is akin to the parents selling their daughter.

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rickshaw - a two-wheeled, human-powered vehicle

Would any bride like to travel on a rickshaw on her wedding day? It would be fun. Let's hope her man is strong enough to pull it with her sitting behind. :D





 

35 comments:

  1. exchange cash, gold, cars, houses the best la HAHAHA! :P

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    1. Yes there is such lobang! so you want to get married soon? haha....

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  2. Having my future hubby (too late for that now! Haha) pulling me on the rickshaw would be great! ;)

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    1. Alamak, don't think too much about replacing your hubby. You could still get your hubby to do that in some parts of China. :)

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    2. Must go to that part of China lah! :)

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  3. Very interesting post and shots. Great way to combine the themes.

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  4. I often see citrus, particularly oranges being offered in altars in Asian culture. I am intrigued and at the same time pleased about the raw pork offering :)

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    Replies
    1. Interesting huh? I was able to understand more because of a museum guide. And she has many stories to tell.

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  5. I think it would be fun to have a rickshaw ride on your wedding day, granted I would be in the sitting position so easy for me to say so Ha! :) Great blog post ECL Its nice to learn about other cultures and customs :)

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    1. I think all the ladies would love to be in the sitting position on a rickshaw. :)

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  6. It's very interesting culture. Thanks for sharing. :)

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  7. Brandy? At a Peranakan wedding -- really?! :O

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    1. Yes. During the Lap Chai ceremony at traditional weddings, gifts such as brandy and rose syrup were exchanged between the bride and groom's families.

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  8. Very interesting ! Would be a little difficult to do in my son's case, they live together since 8 years, and have a son, so obviously she is not a virgin anymore and she is vegetarian too so the porc is out of question ! and the parents are divorced !
    Hard to keep up traditions nowadays ! My son will get married on August 30, and little 2 1/2 year old Toby will assist to his parents wedding ! And my duty is probably to keep him quiet !

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    Replies
    1. You are hilarious Gattina!!

      I am excited to hear that they are going to have a wedding. I can't wait to see little Toby dressed in his best man suit. You should shoot a video on this memorable occasion.

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  9. I didn't know that citrus was a proper wedding gift... maybe I should have bought those plates I saw in Italy!
    Happy Hunting ~

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  10. How interesting! so different from the weddings I have gone to. Happy weekend ECL.Let's all ride the rickshaw :)

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  11. How interesting! so different from the weddings I have gone to. Let's all ride the rickshaw!! Cheers.

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  12. What an interesting take on the citrus theme...I always love to learn something new.

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  13. Hi ECL, it is so interesting to hear about different traditions for weddings. The rickshaw ride sounds like a fun one. I attended a wedding where the bride and groom were lifted up while sitting in their chairs by the families and then paraded around the dance floor. It was really cool. Gattina's comment made me giggle. :) Her grandson is the cutest.

    Thank you so much for sharing. Have a wonderful weekend.

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  14. interesting tradition, ECL. wonder how it would go if the groom is not strong enough to pull the rickshaw. :(

    i played this saturday and it can be found here.

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  15. interesting tradition, ECL. wonder how it would be like if the groom is not strong enough to pull the rickshaw. :(

    i played today and it's here here.

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  16. Oh raw pork trotter exchange? Would be tough for the man to pull the rickshaw if his bride is heavy! Hahaha!!

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  17. Not many marriage custom are taken to heart this day. The other day I ask a Jewish lady about breaking a glass at there wedding...It simple means that the male is boss...Any how I got an ear full.

    Coffee is on

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  18. raw pork trotter? that sounds interesting!

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  19. Very interesting, so Peranakans called 'Lap Chai' ceremony which is equivalent to 過大禮guò dà lǐ *pinyin* what we Cantonese say 'gwo daai lai'.

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  20. Well various dialects have their own rules and regulations with T&C *terms & conditions* apply haha. Normally the opposite party would return half of what is given but not sure the raw pork trotter would be cut into half and if yes who takes the upper portion hahaha.

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  21. This is a crucial ceremony for both parties to make or break the "in-laws" relationship where both need agree to the T&C. Have known a classic case of my own distant relative whereby the bride's side 'demanded' exorbitantly which ended quite ugly. In Cantonese we say 'chan ka' became 'yin ka'. (lit. instead of good in-laws became enemies)

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  22. Very interesting to learn abt the different customs and traditions of different cultures, thanks for sharing! :)

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  23. Can't rem the last time I rode a beca! ;)

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  24. Raw pork trotter? Didn't know that. I thought supposed to returned the roast pig head and tail to symbolise everything is ok.

    Guess Peranakan is a bit different from the Chinese

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